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Tuesday, 5 November 2013

Beringer Founders Estate Zinfandel 2010 (nr 6718, 99 SEK)

Jacob Beringer left his home in Mainz, Germany, in 1868 to start a new life in the U.S. Jacob took up residence in a farmhouse in the California wine country built in 1848, now referred to as the “Hudson House.” Meticulously restored and expanded, the Hudson House serves today as Beringer Vineyards' Culinary Arts Center. In 1883, Frederick permanently moved to the Napa Valley and began construction of a 17-room mansion that was to be his home. Beringer Vineyards is the oldest continuously operating winery in the Napa Valley. In 2001, the estate was placed on the National Register for Historic Places as a Historic District.

Beringer Founders Estate Zinfandel 2010 is made from grapes harvested at the winery’s original location mentioned in the paragraph above. This is as close to the quintessential California Zinfandel - a wonderfully rich and intense wine – that you can come. It has notes of vanilla and nutmeg that are complimented by rich, blackberry flavors with a hint of black pepper in the finish. It showcases cloves, white pepper and jammy black fruit aromas that lead into a mouth full of black berries and sweet spice.
You’ll also get excellent value for your money!

This wine is very good to drink at once but if you have the patience to store it for 5-7 years it will become excellent. Enjoy this wine with lamb, beef or maybe some nice cured meats and some good cheese. It's also a perfect fit for grilled gourmet sausages, spareribs, or chicken with a zingy tomato sauce.

Here’s another fun fact about Beringer that just makes you like them:
In 2004 Beringer created the monster wine bottle Maximus. It is the world's largest bottle of wine, as certified by the Guinness Book of World Records. The bottle contains 173 bottles of Beringer 2001 Private Reserve Cabernet and sold for $47,500 at a charity auction. 

Nr Systembolaget: 6718
Cost in Sweden: 99 SEK

Written by Kristian Kull

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